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Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease is is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder and the most common cause of dementia, a general term for memory loss and other cognitive abilities.

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

The exact cause for ALS is ambiguous, but experts theorize that environmental and genetic factors may be contributing to the deterioration of motor neurons.

Anorexia Nervosa

Anorexia Nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by an abnormally low body weight, an intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of weight.

Anxiety Disorders

People with Anxiety Disorders frequently have intense, excessive and persistent worry and fear about everyday situations. Often, anxiety disorders involve repeated episodes of panic attacks […]

Appetite Loss

Appetite Loss means you don’t have the same desire to eat as you used to. Signs of decreased appetite include not wanting to eat, unintentional weight loss, and not feeling hungry.

Arthritis

Arthritis is the swelling and tenderness of one or more of your joints. The main symptoms of arthritis are joint pain and stiffness, and the most common types of arthritis are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex developmental condition that involves persistent challenges in social interaction, speech and nonverbal communication, and restricted/repetitive behaviors.

Bulimia Nervosa

Bulimia Nervosa is a serious, potentially life-threatening eating disorder. People with bulimia may secretly binge — eating large amounts of food with a loss of control over the eating — and then purge, trying to get rid of the extra calories in an unhealthy way.

Cachexia

Cachexia is a “wasting” disorder that affects people who are in the late stages of serious diseases like cancer, HIV or AIDS, COPD, kidney disease, and congestive heart failure (CHF).

Cancer

Cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the body and often develops when the body’s normal control mechanisms stop working. Old cells do not die and instead grow out of control, forming new, abnormal cells.

Causalgia

Causalgia is a rare pain syndrome related to partial peripheral nerve injuries. The peripheral nervous system encompasses nerves that extend from the central nervous system of the brain and spinal cord to serve limbs and organs.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect movement and muscle tone or posture. It’s caused by damage that occurs to the immature brain as it develops, most often before birth.

Chiari Malformation

Chiari Malformation is a condition in which brain tissue extends into your spinal canal. It occurs when part of your skull is abnormally small or misshapen, pressing on your brain and forcing it downward.

Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP)

Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) is a rare neurological disorder in which there is inflammation of nerve roots and peripheral nerves and destruction of the fatty protective covering over the nerves.

Chronic Migraines

Chronic Migraines are defined as having at least 15 headache days a month. Chronic headache begins as less frequent headache episodes that gradually change into a more frequent headache pattern.

Chronic Nausea

Chronic Nausea is when the nausea may be present all the time or it may come and go. In some cases the nausea may come on after a triggering factor, such as eating, only to improve and then come on again after the next meal.

Chronic Neuropathic Pain Associated with Degenerative Spinal Disorders

Chronic Neuropathic Pain, sometimes referred to as peripheral neuropathy or peripheral neuritis, is caused by nerve damage. In most cases, neuropathy is caused when a dysfunction occurs in the way nerves respond to trauma or injury.

Chronic Pain

Chronic Pain is pain that carries on for longer than 12 weeks despite medication or treatment. Most people get back to normal after pain following an injury or operation, but sometimes the pain can carry on for longer periods of time.

Chronic Pancreatitis

People with Chronic Pancreatitis have persistent inflammation of the pancreas that leads to permanent damage. The main function of the pancreas is to produce digestive enzymes and hormones, such as insulin, that regulate blood sugar levels.

Chronic Renal Failure

Chronic Renal Failure means your kidneys are damaged and can’t filter blood the way they should. The disease is called “chronic” because the damage to your kidneys happens slowly over a long period of time.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive and fatal brain disease associated with repeated traumatic brain injuries (TBIs), including concussions and repeated blows to the head. It is also associated with the development of dementia.

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS)

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) is a form of chronic pain that usually affects an arm or a leg. CRPS typically develops after an injury, a surgery, a stroke or a heart attack.

Crohn’s Disease

Crohn's Disease is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It causes inflammation of your digestive tract, which can lead to abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, fatigue, weight loss and malnutrition.

Cystic Fibrosis (CF)

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder that causes severe damage to the lungs, digestive system and other organs in the body. Cystic fibrosis affects the cells that produce mucus, sweat and digestive juices.

Damage to the Nervous Tissue of the Spinal Cord with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity

Spinal cord injuries can result in damaging and often unbearable side effects for patients. Injuries in this area of the body often result in a change, either temporary or permanent, to healthy motor or sensory function.

Decompensated Cirrhosis

Decompensated Cirrhosis is defined as an acute deterioration in liver function in a patient with cirrhosis and is characterised by jaundice, ascites, hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome or variceal haemorrhage.

Dysmenorrhea

Dysmenorrhea, also referred to as menstrual cramps, are throbbing or cramping pains in the lower abdomen. Many women have menstrual cramps just before and during their menstrual periods.

Dystonia

Dystonia is a movement disorder in which your muscles contract involuntarily, causing repetitive or twisting movements. The condition can affect one part of your body, two or more adjacent parts, or all parts of your body.

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome

Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is a group of inherited disorders that affect your connective tissues — primarily your skin, joints and blood vessel walls.

Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a painful disorder in which tissue similar to the tissue that normally lines the inside of your uterus — the endometrium — grows outside your uterus.

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder in which brain activity becomes abnormal, causing seizures or periods of unusual behavior, sensations, and sometimes loss of awareness.

Fibromyalgia

Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Symptoms often begin after physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress.

Fibrous Dysplasia

Fibrous dysplasia is an uncommon bone disorder in which scar-like (fibrous) tissue develops in place of normal bone. This irregular tissue can weaken the affected bone and cause it to deform or fracture.

Freidrech’s Ataxia (FA)

Friedreich Ataxia (FA) is a rare inherited disease that causes progressive nervous system damage and movement problems. It usually begins in childhood and leads to impaired muscle coordination that worsens over time.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve, the health of which is vital for good vision. This damage is often caused by an abnormally high pressure in your eye.

Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated blood.

HIV/AIDS

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a chronic, potentially life-threatening condition caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). By damaging your immune system, HIV interferes with your body's ability to fight infection and disease.

Huntington’s Disease

Huntington's disease is a rare, inherited disease that causes the progressive breakdown (degeneration) of nerve cells in the brain. It affects a person's functional abilities and usually results in movement, cognative, and psychiatric disorders.

Hydrocephalus

Hydrocephalus is the buildup of fluid in the ventricles deep within the brain. The excess fluid increases the size of the ventricles and puts pressure on the brain.

Hydromyelia

Hydromyelia refers to an abnormal widening of the central canal of the spinal cord that creates a cavity in which cerebrospinal fluid can accumulate. As spinal fluid builds up, it may put abnormal pressure on the spinal cord and damage nerve cells and their connections.

Inclusion-Body Myositis (IBM)

Inclusion body myositis (IBM) is one of the most common disabling inflammatory myopathies among patients older than age 50. 1 to nearly 8 annual incidences of IBM are expected in every 1 million Americans.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is an umbrella term used to describe disorders that involve chronic inflammation of your digestive tract.

Insomnia

Insomnia is a common sleep disorder that can make it hard to fall asleep, hard to stay asleep, or cause you to wake up too early and not be able to get back to sleep.

Interstitial Cystitis

Interstitial Cystitis is a chronic condition causing bladder pressure, bladder pain and sometimes pelvic pain. The pain ranges from mild discomfort to severe pain.

Intractable Headache Syndrome

Migraines are a type of headache that tend to cause other symptoms, too, such as nausea and vision problems. They can last for a few hours to a few days. But a migraine that lasts for more than 72 hours is called status migrainosus or intractable headache syndrome.

Intractable Pain

Intractable pain refers to a type of pain that can’t be controlled with standard medical care. Intractable essentially means difficult to treat or manage. This type of pain isn’t curable, so the focus of treatment is to reduce your discomfort.

Intractable Seizures

Intractable Seizures are persistent sudden, uncontrolled electrical disturbance in the brain. It can cause changes in your behavior, movements or feelings, and in levels of consciousness.

Intractable Spasticity

Intractable Spasticity is a muscle control disorder that is characterized by tight or stiff muscles and an inability to control those muscles. In addition, reflexes may persist for too long and may be too strong.

Irreversible Spinal Cord Injury with Objective Neurological Indication of Intractable Spasticity

A spinal cord injury — damage to any part of the spinal cord or nerves at the end of the spinal canal — often causes permanent changes in strength, sensation and other body functions below the site of the injury.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder that affects the large intestine. Signs and symptoms include cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, gas, and diarrhea or constipation, or both.

Lewy Body Dementia (LBD)

Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) is a disease associated with abnormal deposits of a protein called alpha-synuclein in the brain. These deposits, called Lewy bodies, affect chemicals in the brain whose changes, in turn, can lead to problems with thinking, movement, behavior, and mood.

Lupus

Lupus is a chronic disease that can cause inflammation and pain in any part of your body. It’s an autoimmune disease, which means that your immune system attacks healthy tissue instead.

Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome (MALS)

Median Arcuate Ligament Syndrome (MALS) occurs when the arc-shaped band of tissue in the chest area presses on, or traps, the artery that supplies blood to the organs in your upper abdomen.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord. With MS, the immune system attacks the protective sheath that covers nerve fibers and causes communication problems between your brain and the rest of your body.

Muscle Spasms

Muscle Spasms, otherwise known as muscle cramps, occur when a muscle involuntary and forcibly contracts and cannot relax. These are very common and can affect any muscle.

Muscular Dystrophy

Muscular Dystrophy is a group of diseases that cause progressive weakness and loss of muscle mass. In muscular dystrophy, abnormal genes interfere with the production of proteins needed to form healthy muscle.

Myasthenia Gravis

Myasthenia Gravis is characterized by weakness and rapid fatigue of any of the muscles under your voluntary control. It’s caused by a breakdown in the normal communication between nerves and muscles.

Myoclonus

Myoclonus refers to a quick, involuntary muscle jerk. Hiccups are a form of myoclonus, as are the sudden jerks, or “sleep starts,” you may feel just before falling asleep.

Nail-patella Syndrome

Nail-patella Syndrome is characterized by abnormalities of the nails, knees, elbows, and pelvis. The features of nail-patella syndrome vary in severity between affected individuals, even among members of the same family.

Neuro-Behcet’s Autoimmune Disease

Neuro-Behcet’s Autoimmune Disease is a rare disorder that causes blood vessel inflammation throughout your body. The disease can lead to numerous signs and symptoms, which include mouth sores, eye inflammation, skin rashes and lesions, and genital sores.

Neurodegenerative Diseases

Tourette's Syndrome is a disorder that involves repetitive movements or unwanted sounds (tics) that can't be easily controlled. Tics typically show up between ages 2 and 15, with the average being around 6 years of age.

Neurofibromatosis

Neurofibromatosis is a genetic disorder that causes tumors to form on nerve tissue. These tumors can develop anywhere in your nervous system, including your brain, spinal cord and nerves.

Neuropathic Facial Pain

Neuropathic Facial Pain is thought to occur from a nerve injury of some type, and although it involves the trigeminal nerve, many patients have pain conduction through the autonomic nerves in the face.

Neuropathies

Neuropathies, a result of damage to the nerves outside of the brain and spinal cord, often causes weakness, numbness and pain, usually in your hands and feet. It can also affect other areas of your body.

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a disorder in which people have recurring, unwanted thoughts, ideas or sensations that make them feel driven to do something repetitively.

Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Obstructive sleep apnea is a potentially serious sleep disorder. It causes breathing to repeatedly stop and start during sleep. A noticeable sign of obstructive sleep apnea is snoring.

Opioid Use Disorder

Opioid dependence causes withdrawal symptoms, which makes it difficult to stop taking them. Opioid Use Disorder occurs when dependence interferes with daily life.

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. It occurs when the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of your bones wears down over time.

Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI)

Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI) is a group of genetic disorders that mainly affect the bones. People with this condition have bones that fracture easily, often from mild trauma or with no apparent cause.

Parkinson’s Disease

Parkinson's Disease is a progressive nervous system disorder that affects movement. Symptoms start gradually, sometimes starting with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand.

Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD)

Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) is an inherited disorder in which clusters of cysts develop primarily within your kidneys, causing your kidneys to enlarge and lose function over time.

Post-concussion Syndrome

Post-concussion Syndrome, occurs when concussion symptoms last beyond the expected recovery period after the initial injury. These symptoms may include headaches, dizziness, and problems with concentration and memory.

Post-laminectomy Syndrome

Post-laminectomy syndrome is a condition where the patient suffers from persistent pain in the back following surgery to the back. A laminectomy is a procedure where a part of the vertebra that protects the spinal-cord is removed.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that's triggered by a terrifying event. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about the event.

Postherpetic Neuralgia

Postherpetic Neuralgia is the most common complication of shingles. The condition affects nerve fibers and skin, causing burning pain that lasts long after the rash and blisters of shingles disappear.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes red, itchy scaly patches, most commonly on the knees, elbows, trunk and scalp. Psoriasis is a common, chronic disease with no cure.

Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic Arthritis is a form of arthritis that affects some people who have psoriasis — a condition that features red patches of skin topped with silvery scales.

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome (RSD)

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome (RSD) is a disorder that causes lasting pain, usually in an arm or leg, and it shows up after an injury, stroke, or even heart attack.

Residual Limb Pain

Residual Limb Pain, sometimes called stump pain, is a type of pain felt in the part of a limb that remains after an amputation.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect more than just your joints. In some people, the condition can damage a wide variety of body systems, including the skin, eyes, lungs, heart and blood vessels.

Sickle Cell Anemia

Sickle cell anemia is one of a group of disorders known as sickle cell disease. Sickle cell anemia is an inherited red blood cell disorder in which there aren't enough healthy red blood cells to carry oxygen throughout your body.

Sjogren’s Syndrome

Sjogren’s Syndrome is a disorder of your immune system identified by its two most common symptoms — dry eyes and a dry mouth. The condition often accompanies other immune system disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus.

Spasmodic Torticollis

Spasmodic Torticollis, also called cervical dystonia, is a painful condition in which your neck muscles contract involuntarily, causing your head to twist or turn to one side.

Spinal Muscular Atrophy

Spinal Muscular Atrophy is a genetic disorder characterized by weakness and wasting in muscles used for movement. It is caused by a loss of specialized nerve cells, called motor neurons that control muscle movement.

Spinal Stenosis

Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spaces within your spine, which can put pressure on the nerves that travel through the spine. Spinal stenosis occurs most often in the lower back and the neck.

Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA)

Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA) is a term referring to a group of hereditary ataxias that are characterized by degenerative changes in the part of the brain related to the movement control, and sometimes in the spinal cord.

Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome (SCDS)

Superior Canal Dehiscence Syndrome (SCDS) is caused by an abnormal opening between the uppermost semicircular canal in the upper part of the inner ear and the brain. The condition causes problems with hearing and balance.

Syringomyelia

Syringomyelia is a condition characterized by a fluid-filled cavity or cyst known as a syrinx that forms within the spinal cord. Syringomyelia is a chronic condition and a syrinx can expand over time compressing or destroying the surrounding nerve tissue.

Tarlov Cysts

Tarlov Cysts are fluid-filled sacs that affect the nerve roots of the spine, especially near the base of the spine. Individuals may be affected by multiple cysts of varying size.

Terminal Illness

A Terminal Illness is a disease or condition which can’t be cured and is likely to lead to someone’s death. It’s sometimes called a life-limiting illness.

Tourette’s Syndrome

Tourette's Syndrome is a disorder that involves repetitive movements or unwanted sounds (tics) that can't be easily controlled. Tics typically show up between ages 2 and 15, with the average being around 6 years of age.

Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic Brain Injury usually results from a violent blow or jolt to the head or body. An object that penetrates brain tissue, such as a bullet or shattered piece of skull, also can cause traumatic brain injury.

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation and ulcers in your digestive tract. Ulcerative colitis affects the innermost lining of your large intestine and rectum.

Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder

Uncontrolled Intractable Seizure Disorder occurs when seizures can’t be controlled by medicines. About 1 in 3 of people with epilepsy have intractable seizures.




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