Medical Marijuana Conference Returning to Pittsburgh, This Time With ‘420 Games’

The World Medical Cannabis Conference & Expo is returning to Pittsburgh next month with a new feature: The 420 Games.

The 420 Games center on a 4.2 mile run or walk along Pittsburgh’s rivers, with music, vendors and refreshments. There’s no charge to participate, although commemorative T-shirts will be available for $15.

Jim McAlpine, founder of the 420 Games, created the competition to break down marijuana industry stereotypes.

“The 420 Games provides a unique opportunity for athletes and health and wellness enthusiasts to come together and participate in a variety of activities, including a 4.2 mile fun run/walk for cannabis respect and awareness,” McAlpine said in a statement. “Traditional runs tend to be 5Ks, or 3.2 miles. Our race incorporates an additional mile so participants can literally go the extra mile for cannabis.”

The run/walk begins at 1 p.m. April 12, kicking off the second-annual cannabis conference at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. The event runs through April. 14.

Last year’s conference drew the likes of former NFL running back Ricky Williams.

Conference organizers said they expect as many as 6,000 attendees and 175 exhibitors from across the country.

McAlpine will lead a panel about medical marijuana in sports with former professional athletes, including: NFL player and Super Bowl winner Marvin Washington; NFL player Eben Britton; NHL player Riley Cote; and undefeated UFL Middleweight champion Frank Shamrock.

Under state law, patients can apply for a state-issued medical marijuana card if a doctor certifies they have one of 17 qualified medical conditions, included epilepsy, cancer, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis and seizure disorders.

Gov. Tom Wolf signed a medical marijuana bill into law in April 2016. Medical marijuana in Pennsylvania will be available in pills, oils, tinctures or ointments. The Health Department is regulating the program, which forbids smoking marijuana in dry leaf form.

Under state law, patients can apply for a state-issued medical marijuana card if a doctor certifies they have one of 17 qualified medical conditions, including epilepsy, cancer, Crohn’s disease, multiple sclerosis and seizure disorders.

Qualified patients with a doctor’s recommendation will receive a Pennsylvania medical marijuana identification card, allowing the purchase of medical marijuana from an authorized state-licensed medical marijuana dispensary. Dispensaries also are allowed to sell equipment, such as vaping devices for liquid forms, to administer medical marijuana.

Sales at dispensaries opened Feb. 15, although inventory has been scarce due to a lack of growers with available product. State officials expect more growers to be up and running in April.

Source: Ben Schmitt, Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
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